DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

B.A. Biology - Course Descriptions

BIO 1100 Biology: A Human Perspective (4)
A study of the biological principles, with emphasis on their application to the human organism. . Three lecture and two laboratory hours. Offered each semester. Satisfies the laboratory science requirement and is recommended for the student who seeks a single semester course. Both BIO-1110 and BIO-1399 may not be taken for Biology credit in the major or the minor. Course fee required.

BIO 1399 Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature (4)
A study of the general principles of living systems with a focus on chemical, cellular, and metabolic levels of biological organization, emphasizing the role of genetics and evolution. The acquisition of primary literature via electronic data retrieval systems will be emphasized. Students will learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries and present scientific information orally. Four lecture and two laboratory hours. Satisfies the laboratory science requirement and is recommended for students who seek to take a full year of biology. Both BIO 1110 and BIO 1399 may not be taken for Biology credit in the Biology major or minor. Course fee required.

BIO 2060 Human Physiology (4)
A study of the way human systems function and interact. Homeostasis is a central principle to the study of human physiology. Some time is given to examination of dysfunction of human systems. Laboratory involves the study of function using students as subjects in non-invasive procedures. Interactive electronic media are used to model systems in the laboratory. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1399

BIO 2070 Human Anatomy (4)
A study of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which human systems function. The focus of the course is on homeostasis, a dynamic equilibrium regulated locally and by neural and endocrine systems. Some pathologies are covered as a means for appreciating normal function. Students will participate in a number of non-invasive activities. Computer-assisted data acquisition is used for some exercises, including reaction times, muscle function, EKGs, spirometry, and breathing rates. Three lecture and three laboratory hours.

BIO 2110 General Botany (4)
Diversity of algae, bacteria, fungi, and plants will be explored. Structure, function, reproductive cycles, economic/ecological importance, and evolution will be stressed. Pertinent methods will be stressed in labs. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1399

BIO 2120 Zoology (4)
The animal kingdom will be surveyed and each phylum explored. Anatomy, physiology, reproductive processes, distribution, economic and ecological importance, evolution and behavior are stressed. Pertinent methods will be stressed in specified labs. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1399

BIO 2130 Ecology and Evolution (4)
The ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations, including major ecosystem processes and macroevolutionary trends, will be explored. Pertinent methods will be used, including the application of statistical analysis. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 1399, 2110, and 2120, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 3000 Cell Biology (4)
A study of the cell: its origins, submicroscopic structure, and functions within the context of evolution and the physical laws of nature. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3030 Vertebrate Histology (4)
A study of the structure and function of tissues. Specialization of cells for specific functions leads to characteristic cellular structure. Laboratory work consists primarily of microscopic examination of prepared slides. Some laboratories teach students how to fix, section, and stain tissues for microscopic examination. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor.

BIO 3040 Microbiology (4)
A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of microbiology, with emphasis on morphology, physiological processes, and parasitic implications of microorganisms (bacteria, molds, yeast, and viruses); methods of control; immunology; and applied microbiology. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3050 Genetics (4)
A study of the principles of heredity, the nature and method of action of genes. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3070 Plant Systematics (4)
A study of the morphology, ecology, systematics, and evolution of vascular plants, including collection, identification, and classification of the more common forms. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3080 Vertebrate Natural History (4)
A study of the structure, function, and adaptive nature of vertebrate animals, including collecting, identifying, and systematically surveying representatives of the major groups. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3220 Parasitology (4)
A study of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites from the standpoint of morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host-parasite associations, integrated with examples spanning a broad range of topics including parasite community structure, parasite parasite biogeography, and the evolution of host-parasite relationships. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3350 Emerging Infectious Diseases (4)
This course is designed to provide the student with a strong foundation in the social, environmental, economic, and biological aspects of infectious disease (e.g. AIDS malaria, SARS, Yellow Fever, Rabies). Students will develop a deeper understanding of the impact that infectious diseases have on the global community. Three hours credit. Prerequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 130 or permission of the instructor

BIO 3881 Special Topics (Variable Credits)
Course may be repeated.

BIO 4010 Animal Physiology (4)
A study of the physiological mechanisms by which animals function. Homeostatic regulation of body functions of vertebrates and the evolutionary significance of similarities in regulatory mechanisms provides insights into how vertebrates including mammals function. The detrimental effects of chronic stress are emphasized. Students will be used as subjects for all except the skeletal and cardiac muscle labs. Computer-assisted data acquisition is used for most exercises. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor

BIO 4020 Plant Physiology (4)
A study of the morphology and physiology of vascular plants within the context of homeostasis. The evolutionary significance of physiology and form is stressed. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor

BIO 4030 Developmental Biology of Vertebrates (4)
A study of the development of embryos including fertilization, gastrulation, and organogenesis that occur prior to hatching or birth. The course focuses on understanding genes that control development. Changes that occur during maturation, regeneration and aging are also considered. Labs focus on experimental embryology of fish, frogs, chicks, and sea urchins. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor

BIO 4040 Ecology (4)
A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of ecology, with emphasis on interactions within ecosystems as well as challenging ecological issues. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 4050 Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (4)
A comparative study of the anatomy of vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) with an emphasis on the function, adaptive significance, evolutionary history, and phylogenetic implications of body structures. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 2130 or BIO 1399 and permission of the instructor

BIO 4060 Immunology (4)
A study of basic concepts and principles, contemporary issues, and current research in the field of immunology, along with discussion of modern immunological diagnostic tools. Three hours credit. Prerequisites: BIO 304 or permission of the instructor

BIO 4090 Molecular Biology (4)
An advanced consideration of the structure, function, and manipulation of nucleic acids. Topics covered will include DNA, RNA, and protein structure and synthesis, the genetic code, gene regulation, oncogenes, regulation of the cell cycle, and gene cloning. Three lecture and three laboratory hours. Prerequisites: BIO 213 and CHM 101 and 102, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 4810 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4811 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4812 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4813 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4814 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4815 Undergraduate Research (The amount of credit is determined in consultation with department faculty.)
Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair

BIO 4990 Senior Seminar (4)
A consideration of various areas of biology of current interest and concern through use of biological research literature including emphasis on research methodology. Prerequisites: Senior status Offered every semester

ENV 1110 Introduction to Environmental Science (4)
A study of our relationships with the natural world. Fundamental concepts of ecology, awareness of environmental issues, and the need for a sustainable Biosphere will be emphasized. Three lecture and two to three and one half laboratory hours. Satisfies the laboratory science requirement and is recommended for the student who seeks a single semester course.